Stop Writing Your Therapist Website Like People Want Therapy

If you visit any therapist website, you’ll see statements like the following:

  • “We can do EMDR”
  • “Psychotherapy services available”
  • “Get therapy today”

But no one wants to go to therapy. Nor do they want the modalities that many therapists use.

Psychology, mindfulness, CBT, Gottman. These are not wants.

People Want The Transformation

What people truly want is to ease their pain, stop the suffering, end the struggles and arrive somewhere better. They want the destination in their mind: to feel happy, whole, and excited about life.

People don’t buy the modality that you are using nor the therapy itself, they pay for the ease of their suffering. The erasure of their pain.

They want the transformation that therapy can bring, not the process of therapy itself.

And Face It, Therapy Can Be Hard Work

As a sexual abuse survivor that has gone to a lot of therapy, it’s been my experience that going to therapy is challenging.

At one point, I needed sessions twice a week. After my sessions, particularly if they were sessions where I was accessing and processing through deeper stuff, I’d often need to take time to rest.

I would get emotionally exhausted.

I was holding on, trying to get better. Merely holding on already felt like it took a lot of effort. Further making the commitment to show up twice a week took even more effort.

I wasn’t exactly laughing and skipping my way into each session. The sidewalk was not a yellow brick road. I didn’t even get any stickers or candy as part of my visit.

But I loved the emotional release. I loved how I would often feel lighter, seen, less alone. And over time, I transformed my life from a life that was very confusing and dark to one that I wanted to live.

I kept going to therapy because I wanted to live.

Sell The Benefits Of Therapy

Knowing that everyone is in the midst of some sort of something that they want to get out of the question in your marketing becomes: am I highlighting what people want? Or am I highlighting the process?

  • You might think they want EMDR but what they really want is to go through a day of their lives without having a painful flashback
  • You might think they want individual therapy, but what they want is to feel excitement in life again.
  • You might think they want psychological testing, but what they really want are answers about who they are so they can finally have a clear way forward.

How It Works

Once you realize that people want a life transformation, you’ll want to understand how the journey will look for them.

First, they’ll have to get to know, like, and trust you. That’s the baseline starting point. Many factors for getting to know, like, and trust you are visual or having to do with getting referred.

Next, don’t “sell yourself,” instead, meet them where they are in their pain and then sell the destination. Let them know healing is possible and that you’re someone who can help them get there.

The thing is, they already know the pain they are experiencing. They also know the destination they want to reach. It’s easy to sell your solution when you’re just confirming that they’ll get the value they are seeking.

It’s like they are imagining a quiet beach and then you come along and start describing how you can help them go to a place with sand, calm gentle waves, clean breeze, and gentle sunshine.

How do you think they will react? They’ll be like “yes, I finally found someone who understands me. Where I am and where I want to be instead. Take me to the beach!”

And who wouldn’t want to focus on the beach instead of the long drive to get there?

Sell the beach, not the rocky road.

About Kat Love

Hi, I'm Kat! I'm the founder of Empathycopy. Therapists helped me heal from childhood sexual abuse so I started helping therapists with creating their websites through website design. Over time, I realized that I'm passionate about copywriting too. On this blog, I write on topics like how to avoid psychobabble (my nemesis) and how to connect through your writing with empathy. PS. my pronouns are they/them/their.